Confronting Public Endorsements: A Matthew 18 Fallacy

If you have stayed connected to this blog you have seen that I have responded to articles written by high profile pastors, Christian leaders, and academicians in regards to their endorsements of Donald Trump. There has been a continual parade of well-known and influential leaders making the case for the Church to support Donald Trump because he is less of a problem than Hillary Clinton and the only viable alternative. As you are aware from my writings I find that problematic for the Church on the basis of obedience to God’s Word and the presumption of pragmatism. If you read some of the past threads and comments, the discussion can get rowdy. My problem is not so much the passion of the discussion or the rationale that is offered as a defense for Trump, but rather the instant rebuke that is often given to me for daring to respond and critique these leaders endorsements.

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A Response to Dr. Jim Garlow’s Endorsement of Donald Trump

As pained as I was to critique Dr. Wayne Grudem’s endorsement of Trump, I find myself even more conflicted to address the recent Charisma online article by Dr. Jim Garlow. Dr. Garlow is the Senior Pastor of Skyline Wesleyan Church in San Diego, California. He is the recent author of the book, “Well-Versed”, a great resource of biblical insight applied to the tough issues and topics of today. You may read his endorsement and reasons at the following link¬†Here¬†.

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I Am Not The Problem

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It is no secret that barring the finger of God writing Trump on the wall of my office, I am going to vote alternatively from the two-party box. I have been clear that both political candidates of the two-party tango are simply unacceptable for the Christian who endeavors to live and function according to clear biblical precept. I am well aware that I have friends who are legitimate Bible-believing Christians who are seeing it differently. We will agree to disagree…undoubtedly passionately. I can live with that. The question is, “Why can’t some of you?”

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A Fork in the Road

I define politics as the process by which a community of people codify their corporate concerns and values. Politics, by its nature, might include elections, legislation, coalitions, and basically all the things we so easily see accompanying the process of figuring out how a community chooses to live together. Politics is not limited to civil government. How many of us have used the term “office politics” or “church politics”? Politics, to some extent, is unavoidable. The human race is certainly not monolithic in its worldview or value system, which means there will always be some process by which communities, states, and nations determine how to get along and what is best for it’s general public. A quick look around the world to civil governments, as well as noting the variety of church governments, tells us that people see the process of governing in a variety of ways. Monarchies, oligarchies, democracies, dictatorships, and the like checker the landscape. We all have an opinion to what we believe is best.

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